Quotes

Hat tip to Matt for this quote! I’ve been collecting bunches and now with Mac OS X Mail, you’ll get them rotated:

Benjamin Franklin Quotes

Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.
Benjamin Franklin

QuoteGallery.com

Be civil to all; sociable to many; familiar with few; friend to one; enemy to none.

Sun Tzu – Wikiquote

Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.

Sun Tzu – Wikiquote (孫子; SÅ«n Zǐ; c. 6th century BC)

知彼知己,百戰不殆;不知彼而知己,一勝一負;不知彼,不知己,每戰必敗

It is said that if you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles; if you do not know your enemies but do know yourself, you will win one and lose one; if you do not know your enemies nor yourself, you will be imperiled in every single battle.

(Literally). Know [the] other, know [your] self, hundred battles without danger;
not knowing [the] other but know yourself, one win one loss; not
knowing [the] other, not knowing yourself, every battle must [be]
lost.

WikkaWiki hacking

Well, back to making the igncap wiki work. Here are some obscure notes:

# Already talked about how get invite code to work by editing wikka.config.php
# To make sure only registered users can edit a page, you go to “Edit ACL” at the bottom of a page and click on it. Then change the * in the first column to a plus +, this means that only registered users can see the page
# To completely lockdown the Wiki, you need to change the default ACL to +, these are parameters in the wikka.config.php file at the root of the wiki

Change these:

“default_write_acl” => “+”,
“default_read_acl” => “+”,
“default_comment_acl” => “+”,

The default should be “+” for all which means that only registered users can see the pages.

Mac marketshare 66% of computers above $1,000 at retail

Mac Rumors: Apple Mac Rumors and News You Care About

eWeek first reported on an interesting breakdown of Apple’s retail marketshare. According to numbers from the NPD Group, Apple’s Q1 2008 retail (brick and mortar) reached 14%. Note that by limiting it to retail, they’ve excluded online sales and institutional/enterprise sales.

!http://images.macrumors.com/article/2008/05/19/234608-macq108_400.jpg!
Chart from eWeek

More surprising, however, is if you limit the data to computers priced above $1,000, Apple represents 66% of all retail computer sales.

Do Not Upgrade to your TomTom to 7.481

I just updated to the latest version of the firmware and now the TomTom hangs when search for a POI. “Tomtom Forums”:http://www.tomtomforums.com/showthread.php?s=85c58a2c63c0f09ae1ed4748c4fcfe4d&t=8710 reports lots of these problems. Basically, when searching a POI, it hangs on “Wait a moment…” amd then when you try to Find, you get a grey screen.

The above was for the 920, but this is with my 720. Sigh. Sometimes updating to the latest isn’t such a good idea particularly when there isn’t an obvious way to downgrade.

They report the easiest fix is to “roll back” to firmware before 7.481 and restore all directories. Of course I didn’t back anything up, so I’m SOL. One fellow reports downgrarding to 7.221 works. Apparently these are known issues with 7.481 and there isn’t a fix

Here is how you downgrade:

# http://www.oldboy.me.uk/TomTomUpdates/ Go here to find 7.221
# Decompress this to a directory on your computer
# If you have XP, then you can just drag it all to the root of your TomTom (don’t use their cheesy application, do it from the Explorer)
# If you have a Mac, then you have to go to each subdirectory and do this because the Mac replaces an entire directory with the new one, while you just want all the files in them updated.

One fellow did report that deleting some of the POIs may help (I have buckets of POIs from various sites).

http://www.tomtomforums.com/showthread.php?t=8710&page=3 while TomTom support claims that you can fix this by going to http://www.tomtom.com/6221 and downloading the TomTom Clear Flash Tool. Run it three times and this fixes the problems. Most other folks think that this is baloney and won’t work.

Schultzy’s

Here is what I learned from Bruce about restaurants. He knows the folks are “Schultzy’s”:http://www.yelp.com/biz/shultzys-sausage-seattle for quite a while now. He’s a smart guy:

* Its a cash business. So if you aren’t there everyday, it is really easy for a liquor bottle to disappear or for an order not to get rung up and cash disappear. He told one horror story about how an owner discovered the bar manager had stolen tens of thousands of liquor. I remember going on a casino backroom tour and being more impressed with the liquor dispensing system than anything else. They have all the liquor in a central room and tubes run to all the bars. They measure every drink being poored and tie it in with video cameras.
* It’s cheaper to buy pork than rice. Commodity prices have a really direct impact. And food prices can fluctuate 100% from week to week. Right now pork is at $0.99/pound is cheaper than rice at $1.29 so teriyaki places that depend on a little chicken and lots or rice are in trouble. Ketchup was cheap one week and they ended up buying buckets of it.
* Restaurants are a barbell business. Either you have the systems figured out like Chipotle or you are owner/operators where you can trust everyone.

All in all, a reminder of how any restaurant business that’s been around for more than 10 years is a true tribute to achievement.

As an aside, if you are really old, you might remember Shutzy’s from 20 years ago, when another buddy Dave made them famous as a poster child small business. The food by the way was great. Try the Diablo sausage!

Solid State Drives

Drool, drool, solid state drives are on the way. They are as fast as traditional hard disks. They are about $1,000 per 64GB drive which is still expensive but coming down fast. Think about it as the logical upgrade for your current notebook.

AnandTech: 64GB SSD on the Desktop: Samsung and OCZ go mainstream

new mainstream drives offering performance equal to the best mechanical desktop drives in most cases. The sustained read/write rates have increased to the 100/80 MB/s range. Capacities are now standardizing at 64GB with average pricing dropping to around $16 per-GB for the mainstream sector. The highest performing drives feature 120/120 MB/s read/write speeds with capacities up to 128GB, but pricing is around $29~$32 per-GB. In the high performance sector, we expect to see 150/100+ MB/s read/write performance shortly along with capacities up to 128GB around the current price range.

Buying Guides

Dave asked me what review sites I use as he uses “Consumersearch.com”:http://consumersearch.com, I use a different site for each specialty area. And some notes on what’s the right buys…

1. Camcorders.info. The best reviews on video cameras. Canon HF-10 looks like the winner as HD camcorder
2. Dcviews.com. An overview site with links to the very best photography sites. Dpreview.com is the best amongts them. Recommend the Nikon d40x, Nikkor 18-200 lense
3. Gameranking.com. Another overview site for pc and console games.
4. Pcmag.com. Seems like the last site left with any decent unbiased reviews of computer peripherals like monitors, printers, etc. I cross check with PC World.
5. Ilounge.com. Reviews on ipod and iphone accessories.
6. Car and driver. Where I get best car information for performance. Consumer Reports for reliability.
7 Skiing Magazine. Unfortunately their web site is beyond awful, so I get in print their annual ski guide. They are less good on boots.
8. Bicycling Magazine. Same problems as skiing, their website is awful, but print annual bike guides are good. Mtbrreview.com is decent for mountain bikes.
9. Conde Nast Traveler. Their annual review of top hotels is really good. Website is ok.
10. Wine spectator. Actually I really use what costco shows on their bins. Calculate the lowest cost for each point over 90 (that is, if you find a wine at $15 that is 92 points, I buy it over a $50 bottle rated at 93 🙂
11. Storagereview.com. When I want to buy a new hard drive which is amazingly often.
12. Anandtech.com. When I want to figure out what processor to buy and the theory behind it. A good check on when to buy PCs since PC vendors are essentially on the Intel schedule.
13. Macrumors.com so I don’t end up buying a Mac one week before it is obsolete.
14. Apple.com store ratings for Mac peripheral ratings and Discussions.apple.com isn’t well indexed but is best place to figure out if an Apple-made peripheral or products stinks.