One thing that isn’t well documented is what happens to Excel is there is a blank in a cell.

By experimentation it turns out that the wildcard “” does *not match a blank cell, so you need to make sure that you have something in every cell if you want to match it. 

Interestingly, stackoverflow says that you can match a non-blank cell with SUMIFS(S:S, C:C, "<>") but it isn’t clear how you match an actual blank cell. Seems like there is no wya to do this.

As another aside, if you cell has a wildcard, how do you match it?

Also what happens if you want to match an actual asterick or question mark in a cell, apparently, the tilde let’s you do that with SUMIFS(S:S, C:C, "~?") or SUMIFS(S:S, "~*") if that makes sense. I usual think of the tilde as a negation and would have though backslash would do it. 

As an aside, you can do these kind of and queries by just duplicating the ranges, so you can use this for inclusion test so for instance to find cells that a >100 and <500, you can do SUMIF(S:S, S:S, "&lt;100", S:S, "&lt;500")

Man the old days of Excel are long gone, now you can generate incredibly powerful array actions so easily when doing the equivalent of database lookups. As ablebits.com explains this thing starts to look like APL:

So for instance to add all the cells in column C where column A has the text “apple” and B has “banana”, it’s a one liner. Note that the syntax C:C means the entire column C from top to bottom:

 


SUMIFS(C:C, A:A, "apple", B:B "banana")

You can also add arithmetic tests, so this is the sum of everything in C where column D is larger than 1000


SUMIFS(C:C, D:D, ">1000")

You can create really complex strings with the string concatenation, so for instance you can do date checks in column E and you can create an AND easily enough, by specifying the same column twice, so this means look for all dates in column E that are today or a week from now:


SUMIFS(C:C, E:E, ">="@TODAY(), E:E "<=@TODAY()+7)

Then there is highly complicated syntax for looking for blank cells or things that evaluate to blank, so the criteria “=” means if you have a true blank (nothing in it cell), whereas “” means look for cells that evaluate to visually blank cells like null length strings whereas “<>” mean look for non-empty cells including those with zero length strings.

As an aside, SUMIF is nice for an AND, but if you want an OR, then you can use the array syntax which is a string with braces, the first example sums column C if the strings hello or world are in column F. The next one sums if the values 1, 20 or 30 are in column G


SUMIFS($C:$C, F:F, { "hello", "world" }) SUMIFS($C:$C, G:G, {1, 20, 30}}

If you want the above to be variable then you have to use a different approach as this array notation doesn’t store correctly. Instead you have to use the SUMPRODUCT function. This thing, so assuming that the criteria are stored in say K100:K102, then this says sum all the values in column C where column G is larger than 1000 and column H has any of the strings in K100, k101 and k101


SUMPRODUCT($C:$C, --(G:G > 1000), --(ISNUMBER(MATCH(H:H, K100:K102,0)))

Why does this work, well, SUMPRODUCT basically a multiple of each list member and then adds then, so 


SUMPRODUCT( {1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}) = 1*4 + 2*5 + 3*6

Or more generally SUMPRODUCT ( {l1, l2, l3} , {m1, m2, m3} ) but the real trick is what if the list is actually a boolean expression, so –(G:G > 1000) is actually a huge set of boolean values that test the entire column G looking for values > 1000, it looks conceptually like, { FALSE, TRUE, …. }. The funny operator — is basically a double negation and coerces FALSE to be a 0 and TRUE to be a 1. You can also coerce by adding a zero or multiplying by 1. Both look just a wierd to me as the — looks like a C decrement, although (G:G&gt;1000)*1 is hardly better.

The next thing is that MATCH function. This says go MATCH(list, criteria, type) so it goes through the first argument (in this case column H) and finds the first match for each the other arguments. type 0 means that the list is unsorted and it stops at the first occurance. So you will get a long string for all the items in column H that look like { 0, 2, 1, #N/A, 2, #N/A} so if it finds a match, it tells you which one in K100:K102 matches and if it doesn’t it returns a #N/A. 

So the ISNUMBER converts this all to a boolean where TRUE means that some match was found between column H and the search criteria and FALSE means it got an #N/A. 

Finally the product nows does boolean arithmetic. That is you multiple C by 1 if the G:G>1000 matches and by 1 onliy if a match was found, so this is the backwards way of getting an AND because you onlyi get a real C if all the criteria are true (eg 1s). Pretty roundabout and computationally inefficient but it is elegant to express.

Finally, SUMIFS is a relatively recent addition, the old way of doing this was by using boolean arrays and multiplications, so 


SUMIFS(C:C, A:A, "apple", B:B, "bananas") = SUM ( (C:C) * (A:A = "apple") * (B:B = "banana"))

 

 

Using Mac Excel heavily and it is good that some of my favorite commands are still there and there is a long shortcut list

Most Mac keyboards, you need the additional FN key

To

Press

Open the Formula Builder

FN + SHIFT + F3

Repeat the last Find (Find Next)

FN + SHIFT + F4

Close the window

FN +  COMMAND + F4

Display the Go To dialog box

FN + F5

Display the Find dialog box

SHIFT + FN + F5

Move to the next pane in a workbook that has been split

FN + F6

Move to the previous pane in a workbook that has been split

SHIFT + FN + F6

Move to the next workbook window

COMMAND + FN + F6

Move to the previous workbook window

COMMAND + SHIFT + FN + F6

Check spelling

FN + F7

Add to the selection

SHIFT + FN + F8

Display the Macro dialog box

FN + OPTION + F8

Calculate all sheets in all open workbooks.

F9

Calculate the active sheet.

SHIFT + F9

Display a contextual menu.

SHIFT + F10

Insert a new chart sheet.

F11

Insert a new sheet.

SHIFT + F11

Insert an Excel 4.0 macro sheet

COMMAND+ F11
or
FN +  COMMAND + F11

Display the Save As dialog box.

F12

Display the Open dialog box

COMMAND + F12
or
FN +  COMMAND + F12

Moving and scrolling in a sheet or workbook 

To

Press

Move one cell up, down, left, or right

An arrow key

Move to the edge of the current data region

CONTROL + arrow key

Move to the beginning of the row

HOME

Move to the beginning of the sheet

CONTROL + HOME

Move to the last cell in use on the sheet, which is the cell at the intersection of the rightmost column and the bottom row (in the lower-right corner); or the cell opposite the home cell, which is typically A1

CONTROL + END

Move down one screen

PAGE DOWN

Move up one screen

PAGE UP

Move one screen to the right

OPTION + PAGE DOWN

Move one screen to the left

OPTION + PAGE UP

Move to the next sheet in the workbook

CONTROL + PAGE DOWN

Move to the previous sheet in the workbook

CONTROL + PAGE UP

Move to the next workbook or window

CONTROL + TAB

Move to the previous workbook or window

CONTROL + SHIFT + TAB

Move to the next pane in a workbook that has been split

F6

Move to the previous pane in a workbook that has been split

SHIFT + F6

Scroll to display the active cell

CONTROL + DELETE

Display the Go To dialog box

CONTROL + G

Display the Find dialog box

COMMAND + F

Repeat the last Find action (same as Find Next)

COMMAND + G

Move between unlocked cells on a protected sheet

TAB

Previewing and printing

To

Press

Display the Print dialog box

COMMAND + P

Entering data on a sheet

To

Press

Complete a cell entry and move forward in the selection

RETURN

Start a new line in the same cell

CONTROL + OPTION + RETURN

Fill the selected cell range with the text that you type

CONTROL + RETURN

Complete a cell entry and move back in the selection

SHIFT + RETURN

Complete a cell entry and move to the right in the selection

TAB

Complete a cell entry and move to the left in the selection

SHIFT + TAB

Cancel a cell entry

ESC

Delete the character to the left of the insertion point, or delete the selection

DELETE

Delete the character to the right of the insertion point, or delete the selection

Delete

Delete text to the end of the line

CONTROL +  Delete

Move one character up, down, left, or right

An arrow key

Move to the beginning of the line

HOME

Repeat the last action

COMMAND + Y

Edit a cell comment

SHIFT + F2

Fill down

CONTROL + D

Fill to the right

CONTROL + R

Define a name

CONTROL + L

Working in cells or the Formula bar

To

Press

Edit the active cell and then clear it, or delete the preceding character in the active cell as you edit the cell contents

DELETE

Complete a cell entry

RETURN

Enter a formula as an array formula

CONTROL + SHIFT + RETURN

Cancel an entry in the cell or formula bar

ESC

Display the Formula Builder after you type a valid function name in a formula

CONTROL + A

Insert a hyperlink

COMMAND + K

Edit the active cell and position the insertion point at the end of the line

CONTROL + U

Open the Formula Builder

SHIFT + F3
or
FN + SHIFT + F3

Calculate all sheets in all open workbooks 

COMMAND + =

Calculate the active sheet

COMMAND + SHIFT + =

Start a formula

=

Toggle the formula reference style between absolute, relative, and mixed

COMMAND + T

Insert the AutoSum formula

COMMAND + SHIFT + T

Enter the date

CONTROL + SEMICOLON (;)

Enter the time

COMMAND + SEMICOLON (;)

Copy the value from the cell above the active cell into the cell or the formula bar

CONTROL + SHIFT + INCH MARK (“)

Alternate between displaying cell values and displaying cell formulas

CONTROL + GRAVE ACCENT (`)

Copy a formula from the cell above the active cell into the cell or the formula bar

CONTROL + APOSTROPHE (‘)

Display the AutoComplete list

CONTROL + OPTION + DOWN ARROW

Define a name

CONTROL + L

Formatting and editing data

To

Press

Display the Style dialog box

COMMAND + SHIFT + L

Display the Format Cells dialog box

COMMAND + 1

Apply the general number format

CONTROL + SHIFT + ~

Apply the currency format with two decimal places (negative numbers appear in red with parentheses)

CONTROL + SHIFT + $

Apply the percentage format with no decimal places

CONTROL + SHIFT + %

Apply the exponential number format with two decimal places

CONTROL + SHIFT + ^

Apply the date format with the day, month, and year

CONTROL + SHIFT + #

Apply the time format with the hour and minute, and indicate A.M. or P.M.

CONTROL + SHIFT + @

Apply the number format with two decimal places, thousands separator, and minus sign (-) for negative values

CONTROL + SHIFT + !

Apply the outline border around the selected cells

COMMAND + OPTION + ZERO

Add an outline border to the right of the selection

COMMAND + OPTION + RIGHT ARROW

Add an outline border to the left of the selection

COMMAND + OPTION + LEFT ARROW

Add an outline border to the top of the selection

COMMAND + OPTION + UP ARROW

Add an outline border to the bottom of the selection

COMMAND + OPTION + DOWN ARROW

Remove outline borders

COMMAND + OPTION + HYPHEN

Apply or remove bold formatting

COMMAND + B

Apply or remove italic formatting

COMMAND + I

Apply or remove underscoring

COMMAND + U

Apply or remove strikethrough formatting

COMMAND + SHIFT + X

Hide rows

CONTROL + 9

Unhide rows

CONTROL + SHIFT + (

Hide columns

CONTROL + ZERO

Unhide columns

CONTROL + SHIFT + )

Add or remove the shadow font style

COMMAND + SHIFT + W

Add or remove the outline font style

COMMAND + SHIFT + D

Edit the active cell

CONTROL + U

Cancel an entry in the cell or the formula bar

ESC

Edit the active cell and then clear it, or delete the preceding character in the active cell as you edit the cell contents

DELETE

Paste text into the active cell

COMMAND + V

Complete a cell entry

RETURN

Enter a formula as an array formula

CONTROL + SHIFT + RETURN

Display the Formula Builder after you type a valid function name in a formula

CONTROL + A

Working with a selection

To

Press

Copy the selection

COMMAND + C

Cut the selection

COMMAND + X

Paste the selection

COMMAND + V

Clear the contents of the selection

DELETE

Delete the selection

CONTROL + HYPHEN

Copy text or graphics to the Scrapbook 

CONTROL + OPTION + C

Paste to the Scrapbook 

CONTROL + OPTION + V

Undo the last action

COMMAND + Z

Move from top to bottom within the selection (down), or move in the direction that is selected in Edit in the Preferences dialog box (Excel menu, Preferences command)

RETURN

Move from bottom to top within the selection (up), or move opposite to the direction that is selected in Edit in the Preferences dialog box (Excel menu, Preferences command)

SHIFT + RETURN

Move from left to right within the selection, or move down one cell if only one column is selected

TAB

Move from right to left within the selection, or move up one cell if only one column is selected

SHIFT + TAB

Move clockwise to the next corner of the selection

CONTROL + PERIOD

Insert graphics using the Media Browser 

COMMAND + CONTROL + M

Selecting cells, columns, or rows

To

Press

Extend the selection by one cell

SHIFT +arrow key

Extend the selection to the last nonblank cell in the same column or row as the active cell

COMMAND+ SHIFT +arrow key

Extend the selection to the beginning of the row

SHIFT + HOME

Extend the selection to the beginning of the sheet

CONTROL + SHIFT + HOME

Extend the selection to the last cell used on the sheet (lower-right corner)

CONTROL + SHIFT + END

Select the entire column

CONTROL + SPACEBAR

Select the entire row

SHIFT + SPACEBAR

Select the entire sheet

COMMAND + A

Select only the active cell when multiple cells are selected

SHIFT + DELETE

Extend the selection down one screen

SHIFT + PAGE DOWN

Extend the selection up one screen

SHIFT + PAGE UP

Alternate between hiding objects, displaying objects, and displaying placeholders for objects

CONTROL + 6

Show or hide the Standard toolbar

CONTROL + 7

Turn on the capability to extend a selection by using the arrow keys

F8

Add another range of cells to the selection; or use the arrow keys to move to the start of the range you want to add, and then press F8 and the arrow keys to select the next range

SHIFT + F8

Select the current array, which is the array that the active cell belongs to

CONTROL + /

Select cells in a row that don’t match the value in the active cell in that row. You must select the row starting with the active cell.

CONTROL + \

Select only cells that are directly referred to by formulas in the selection

CONTROL + SHIFT + [

Select cells in a column that don’t match the value in the active cell in that column. You must select the column starting with the active cell.

CONTROL + |

Select all cells that are directly or indirectly referred to by formulas in the selection

CONTROL + SHIFT + {

Select only cells with formulas that refer directly to the active cell

CONTROL + ]

Select all cells with formulas that refer directly or indirectly to the active cell

CONTROL + SHIFT + }

Select only visible cells in the current selection

COMMAND + SHIFT + Z

Charts

To

Press

Insert a new chart sheet.

F11

Cycle through chart object selection

An arrow key

Data forms

To

Press

Move to the same field in the next record

DOWN ARROW

Move to the same field in the previous record

UP ARROW

Move to the next field that you can edit in the record

TAB

Move to the previous field that you can edit in the record 

SHIFT + TAB

Move to the first field in the next record

RETURN

Move to the first field in the previous record

SHIFT + RETURN

Move to the same field 10 records forward

PAGE DOWN

Move to the same field 10 records back

PAGE UP

Move one character left within a field

LEFT ARROW

Move one character right within a field

RIGHT ARROW

Select the character to the left

SHIFT + LEFT ARROW

Select the character to the right

SHIFT + RIGHT ARROW

Filters and PivotTable reports

To

Press

Display the Filter list or PivotTable page field pop-up menu for the selected cell

OPTION + DOWN ARROW

Outlining data

To

Press

Display or hide outline symbols

CONTROL + 8

Hide selected rows

CONTROL + 9

Unhide selected rows

CONTROL + SHIFT + (

Hide selected columns

CONTROL + ZERO

Unhide selected columns

CONTROL + SHIFT + )

Toolbars

To

Press

Make the first button on a floating toolbar active

OPTION + F10

When a toolbar is active, select the next button or menu on the toolbar

TAB

When a toolbar is active, select the previous button or menu on the toolbar

SHIFT + TAB

Perform the action assigned to the selected button

RETURN

Windows

To

Press

Expand or minimize the ribbon 

COMMAND + OPTION + R

Switch to the next application

COMMAND + TAB

Switch to the previous application

COMMAND + SHIFT + TAB

Close the active workbook window

COMMAND + W

Restore the active workbook window size

COMMAND + F5

Move to the next pane in a workbook that has been split

F6

Move to the previous pane in a workbook that has been split

SHIFT + F6

Switch to the next workbook window

COMMAND + F6

Switch to the previous workbook window

COMMAND + SHIFT + F6

Copy the image of the screen to the Clipboard

COMMAND + SHIFT + 3

Copy the image of the active window to the Clipboard (after pressing and releasing the key combination, click the window that you want to take a picture of).

COMMAND + SHIFT + 4

A great conversation with Vlad about setting up different servers in a development environment. Many of these loads are today run in virtual machines on a single system. The latest hypervisors have reduced the VM overhead to 5% so it makes so much sense to run them virtually particularly if you dedicate a slice of disk to a specific VM. To summarize, here are four different workloads and how you might set them up.

Host system

The is mainly just booting and boot is mainly a read requirement. This is where a consumer oriented drive makes sense (Evo 850 class).

The one thing about running different virtual machines is that you need much more memory to make this efficient. A server motherboard handles 256GB to 512GB

File Server

For things that are read and write traffic. For small servers, the overhead of RAID is necessary when hardware costs are high, but mirroring is very fast. It doesn’t reduce bandwidth. So for instance, if you just want 4TB of storage then just a mirrored system is actually pretty simple to spend the relatively low cost of incremental capacity now ($250). Other piece of advice is that the near-line SAS is a good tradeoff between lower cost SATA and full enterprise SAS for this purpose.

So many times, you don’t need the complexity of RAID rebuild times and a simple mirror does most of the work for you. 

Build Server

Building is all about writing when you are building a system. You want an SSD that really does well at writes. The workstation class SSDs (which cost more) is good such as the Samsung Evo Pro

Video Server

This is a server that is mainly for playback so you want good read characteristics

Well, this is one shall we say “manly” laptop. I do have to say I’m spoiled by the industrial design of Apple. But nonetheless, it is certainly powerful (if amazingly thick and bulky). Here are some tips, tricks and traps:

Tricks on Magic Keys

The documentation is pretty unclear, but there is a BIOS setup and it uses the follow “standard” keys. I haven’t used Windows in so long I’ve forgotten. But holding a key down during boot does:

  • DEL. Puts you into the setup menu, there is a new feature called secure boot that makes it hard to install Ubuntu
  • F11. This gives you the boot menu so you can find say a USB key that you want to run (some guides say F3).

Tricks in installing Ubuntu

  1. Enable Intel Graphics. Well, this thing uses the GTX 980M graphics and it is on by default. That means that Ubuntu can’t install as it doesn’t have the drivers for it. This isn’t in the BIOS, instead, you need to boot to Windows and then hit the second magic key on the left. This is the discrete vs integrated graphics key. If the light is off you are using the integrated and that is what Ubuntu likes.
  2. Separate boot and data drives. The system QE2 comes with a 128GB M.2 boot drive and a 1TB data drive. You can also install three other M.2 drives if you tear the machine up. I’ve got an M.2 on order, but in the mean time, you can use the data drive which in Ubuntu talk is /dev/sdb
  3. The Killer wifi N1525 card (from Qualcomm) isn’t supported by Ubuntu Live USB key so you have to live without it and used a wired connection at first then look for the drivers. And it looks like the Ath10k driver might some day support the 1525, but in the mean time, no Wifi under Ubuntu if you have this.
  4. Qualcomm Atheros Killer E2200. This is the gigabit ethernet and it is in the latest linux system.
  5. Bluetooth. This also does not work. Drivers stink!
  6. Enable GTX 970. You have to jump to Windows (?!!) to switch to the discrete graphics. So it sounds like you have to start the nVidia drivers (as ubuntu can’t handle the GTX 980M) and then install the nvidia drivers and then go back to Linux to start it. Ugh. Trying it now.

I’ve been using MythTV pretty well along with XBMC. XBMC’s add-on even lets you watch MythTV recording from a HD HomeRun Prime from XBMC and it all worked fine on Mavericks.

Now in the Yosemite world and also the latest XBMC now called Kodi and the new MythTV 0.27. Here are the steps:

  1. Yosemite upgrade was pretty easy (surprisingly from Mavericks) and even seems a bit faster on my old and slow Mac Mini running it.
  2. Kodi seems buggy compared with XBMC and now has audio sync problems more often. Fortunately, I’m getting pretty good at eyeballing the sync and it is on the play screen. It seems to be fine when using VLC, so it’s a Kodi problem. Usually about 0.5-1 second audio behind the video. Also, it does seem to get confused about handling encoded HDMI input.
  3. MythTV 0.27. This now uses MacPorts which is great. One tricky thing is that MacPorts requires a Xcode update and complete uninstall and reinstall on every operating system updates (?!!!). In my case, when I tried to do a sudo port update outdated I got a compiler does not exist error because it is trying to use the wrong compiler. So make sure you do a sudo port -f uninstall installed and it works much better

Well, built the second of four Haswell towers based on the SG-10B mini-tower using the ASRock Z97m OC Formula with the Noctua NH-L12 and the Scythe Rev B:

  • Scythe Rev B. This is a low profile fan unit. The main problem is there is no clearance possible with the heat sinks on the regulator. Also the A.Data XPG v2 is pretty tall as well and this fan hits it
  • Noctua NH-L12. The Silverstone SG-10B is tall but this is wide with a 120mm down blown fan. It fits, but blocks the second GPU so need to find a cooler that is relatively tall. It is 120x120m

Note that these are things that pcpartspicker.com can’t detect. Need to find something with a narrow footprint:

The NH-U9S is the latest in Noctua’s NH-U9 series of 9cm coolers. Along with the latest 90mm PWM fan, it has 5 heatpipes – presumably the latest revision that was introduced with the NH-U14S we liked so much. With its 95x95mm footprint, the NH-U9S clears the RAM and PCI-E slots on all Intel and “most” AMD motherboards, including uATX and ITX. 125mm height.

The SG10 cases have these restrictions:

  • 337mm graphics card length. This fits the ASUS Strix GTX 970 easily
  • 165mm cpu cooler height. So it can fit even the very tall NH-U12S at 158mm
  • 180mm power supply length. The Corsait AX-760 (a full sized supply fits)

The main issue is that in SLI configuration, the cooler can’t be too low and the the Ram coolers. And it can’t be too wide and interfere with the nearest PCI Express slot. The 95mm wide ones won’t as that is the width of the CPU heat brackets. So the NH12U is an interesting candidate as it is rectangular: 125mm x 140mm.

The SSD pricing is sure dynamic. So it’s nice that Tom’s Hardware updates this regularly which updates the Anandtech Best SSDs for July 2014 as well as StorageReview.com which did a good comparison of the Evo 850 Pro, Evo 850, Evo 840 and the Sandisk Extreme Pro which showed the 1TB Evo 850 very good at synthetics and both the 256 and 1TB excellent at the real world.

  • Evo 850 vs Evo 850 Pro. The Evo 850 like the GTX 970 (vs GTX980) is the best price/performance and also uses the V-NAND. You get nearly the Evo Pro performance but at price closer to the budget levels.

So here are the current recommendations:

Budget buys that are good for bulk storage and where highest performance isn’t a huge issue and the Crucial MX100 is a good deal.

  • Crucial MX100. 256GB. $119.
  • Crucial MX100. 512GB. $225.
  • Evo 850 1TB. $500. This is interestingly is the best value in the whole list and a high performer as well. Have you’re cake and eat it too.

Performance matters but don’t want to pay a super arm and the leg

  • Evo 850 256GB. $139.
  • Evo 850 500GB. $270.
  • Evo 850 1TB. $500

Net net a good configuration might be a boot drive which is a Evo 850 256 and then as main storage in Evo 850 1TB. Of course if you want lots of desktop storage, then a single spindle 4TB drives but reliability is always an issue.

Then for mSATA, they recommend the Evo 840 in all its sizes.

They don’t have an m.2 recommendation but looking at other reviews, it looks like for the more common m.2, there are three things to think about when mixing in pricing. The bigger issue is that the faster drives like Puget systems measure meant of the M6e and the XP941 run very (like 94C to 104C hot!).

Best budget. These use SATA controllers so are limited to SATA 6Gbps (500MBps) speeds and cost is the issue and I’ve used the Crucial M550 m.2 and it booted find on a ASUS H97I-Plus.
Best PCI Express x2. These are native systems that use the full 10GBps and the only one I know is the Plextor M6e but it is so much more expensive (typically 2x the regular SATA), so probably not worth it.
Best PCI Express x4. This the only system that supports the full bandwidth of 20GBps and use the very expensive Samsung XP941 which also runs very hot in the native slot, so you probably only want to use that if you have a full PCI Express.

Why would you pay an extra $50 for a cooler rather than use the stock one that Intel gives you for free? Well the answer is pretty simply put by Tom’s Hardware. The short answer is if you are not overclocking, then the Intel fan makes lots of sense

Great cooling for overclocking

It might not matter for some people, but for at low RPMs the Noctua is more efficient. It will cool to 26C at 1000 RPM while the Intel cooler is 50C.

If you are doing maximum overclocking, then at Max RPM. It will be noisy but will be efficient.

  • Noctua NH-L12 heating +26C for 43.1dB of noise
  • Intel cooler +35.8C (so right at thermal limits) for a little less noise of 40dB

At low noise, you can overclock

It’s interesting to see that the heating at 1000 rpm which is much quieter basically has the same level of cooling:

  • Noctua NH-L12 heating 26.7C at 1000 rpm (so slowing to 1000 rpm only is a 0.7 difference) but is much quieter at 36.8dB
  • Intel cooler is basically not super practical at 1000 rpm generating >50C heating at 36.9dB

So the net is that the Intel cooler is louder at low RPMs and is less efficient (35.8C at maximum RPM), so the Noctua is way better and you’d want to run it at 1000 rpm and get be 10C more efficient on cooling. That won’t matter too much unless you care about noise or overclocking.